Category Archives: Tactile Images

Guise’s Familistere – a comprehensive accessibility chain project

Guise’s Familistère is a complex of buildings built by the manufacturer and utopian socialist Jean-Baptiste André Godin in the mid-19th century. It is considered as one of the first (if not the first) social housing construction at all. The design solutions imagined were used more than 50 years later by architects such as Le Corbusier. Read More

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Museum Quai d'Orsay - Taststation

“The Painter’s Worshop” (1855) Gustave Courbet – Musée d’Orsay – Paris – 2016

The Tactile exploration of the painting « L’Atelier du peintre » is part of a sensory multimodal experience.  It took place during the restoration of the masterpiece in 2016-17, inside the museum itself. Read More

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Louvre – Petite Galerie – Exhibition “Founding Myths. From Hercules to Darth Vader” – 2015

The Petite Galerie du Louvre is the museum’s center for learning and adresses children and youngsters, their parents and educators alike. It is here that a sample of the collection is put together for better understanding. Tactile Studio was asked to conceive a tactile book for the blind and visually impaired visitors. In 2015 the Petite Galerie’s exhibition «Founding Myths. From Hercules to Darth Vader» (Oct. 12, 2015 – July 4, 2016) illustrated how artists around the world have reanimated old myths in painting, sculpture, cinema, music and more. The tactile book is subtle, gentle to touch and durable, thanks to tearproof material used. Read More

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Tastblatt in Cognac-Zay

Museum Cognacq-Jay – Paris – 2015

With the exposition „Thé, Café ou Chocolat?“ (2015) the Cognacq-Jay Museum traced the beginning and the rapid success of cultivating «exotic» drinks among the nobels of the 18th-century society. Our team conceived objects that gives rhythm to the exhibition. A tactile information sheet describes the canvases and engravings exhibited. Read More

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Tastbuch Louvre Lens

Museum Louvre-Lens – Lens – 2014

The tactile booklet, conceived and edited by the Museum Louvre Lens tells us about the developement of writing in centuries. Beside new ways of access to knowledge this booklet wants to make the discovery of the exhibited objects more joyful and funny. Each object is translated into a tactile high-relief or gravure printing according to the form of the ancient writing: high-reliefs for egyptian hyroglyphes, gravure printing for greek and arabic texts for example. Next to this, a photograph displays the original. Read More

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Tastbuch Quai Branly

Museum Quai Branly – Paris – 2013

The tactile book (edition of 500) illustrates the museum collection’s most famous oeuvres, accompanied by descriptions on CD. Tactile Studio delivered graphics that served as model for the blind embossing. In contrast to other exhibition-bound tactile graphic projects this book was conceived for private reading, at home, with time to discover and enjoy the beauty of each relief. We hope that readers will take their time to learn about the details of the museum’s masterpieces. Read More

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Skulptur von Maurice Denis zum Anfassen

Museum Maurice Denis – Saint Germain en Laye – 2012

The museum Maurice Denis, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, organised in 2013 the exhibition “The Universes of Georges Lacombe” (Nov 13, 2012 – Feb 17, 2013). Tactile Studio was chosen to realise a relief interpretation of three paintings and of one bust. In the course of the exhibition another two permanent tactile stations offered a multisensual access to the works displayed. Read More

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